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100 portraits of the 18th century in Nice

ART & CULTURE

Extraites du catalogue de l’exposition, Collection Conservatoire du Portrait du Dix-Huitième Siècle, Paris - Copyright Thierry OllivierIf ever curious to discover the art of making portraits, a place to visit is the Palais Lascaris in Nice. A hundred portraits drawn during the reign of Louis XV and Louis XVI will be displayed in the classical baroque setting from August 13, 2020, until June 30, 2021. Apart from Tuesdays, visitors will have the chance to discover every day, from 10 am to 6 pm, paintings created by famous artists such as Van Loo, Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, Duplessis, Ducreux, and many others.

These artworks, which were recently exhibited at the Lambinet museum in Versailles, were loaned to the Palais Lascaris from the Conservatoire du Portrait du Dix-Huitième Siècle. The society they depict with the strokes of several paintbrushes goes from the French royal family with Louis XV and Louis XVI themselves to the diverse figures which were part of the court. In order to gain social recognition during this period, having a portrait made was a good start. The reason for that was simply due to the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture having placed portraits just after history in the hierarchy of genres.

Extraites du catalogue de l’exposition, Collection Conservatoire du Portrait du Dix-Huitième Siècle, Paris - Copyright Thierry OllivierThe exhibition, as previous mentioned, will be taking place at the Palais Lascaris. Built in the 17th century by the will of Jean-Paul Lascaris, Grand Master of the Order of Malta, the palace became the private residence of the aristocratic Lascaris Ventimiglia family until the later part of the 18th century. It demonstrates the perfect example of baroque architecture. After all, the building, which is situated at the heart of the old Nice, has been the witness of the tumultuous history of its city.

The borrowed works will be exhibited alongside the permanent collection of the museum, from additional portraits to other forms of works of art. Additionally, placed in harmony with the portraits will be the musical instruments that were played by the royal family: Queen Marie Lesczynska, Madame Henriette, Madame Adélaïde, Madame Victoire, and Queen Marie-Antoinette. Overall, the exhibition offers a cultural outing option to discover who belonged in the French society of the 18th century.

To purchase tickets: http://www.nice.fr/fr/culture/musees-et-galeries/preparer-ma-visite

- Charlotte Gillet